“What happens when you let respondents pull surveys out of field?” We answer this question in our cover article in the latest SURVEY Magazine. Sound drastic? It’s not. In fact, there’s nothing more crucial to the success of our industry than respondent engagement and satisfaction. Sample companies can impact outcomes by automating processes to stop bad experiences in their tracks.

In the article, CEO Mathijs de Jong outlines specifics on how the market research industry can start to boost respondent engagement that goes beyond fixing survey design. New technology and access to massive amounts of behavioral data allow sample companies to spot and mitigate bad experiences in real time.

This can be accomplished by examining what respondents are telling us – with their behavioral data. He writes: “Sampling platforms capture typical indicators of performance like dropout rates to overquotas, as well the study parameters like incidence rates and length of interview. We have respondent demographics and profile data and know at what time of day they are answering. We can even capture their ratings of the experience.”

 

It’s how we use this data that makes the difference. Bad experiences aren’t just a function of bad survey design. They also include more 

technical and operational things like bad redirects, programming issues, quotas that are full but not closed, poorly-implemented automation and router dumping. If we use technology like machine learning and automation to spot obstacles to participation automatically and in real time, then we can work together to solve problems while there is still time to do something.

 

In short, “respondents provide the vital data our clients need to make important business decisions. The indisputable consequence of a punishing field experience is bad data.” It’s time to give them the control they deserve – and expect – over their own experiences.

Find out more about how we all have a role to play in respondent engagement and data quality by checking out the complete article here.